“If I can eat, I feel OK.” 「食べられれば大丈夫」

In Member Post on April 18, 2017 by joshsandoz

Contributed by Cécile Buckenmeyer, Jungian Psychotherapist

nature-fashion-person-womanThe interview

On a September morning, in suburban Manchester, I meet Yoko and her two-year old son. We sit in a conservatory furnished with plain, Ikea-style table and chairs; I accept her offer of a glass of water. I came to interview Yoko about her experience of moving to the UK. She arrived four months ago. “My husband was sent to the UK for two or three years”, she says. When I ask her what helps her cope with this transition, she explains that food is very important for her and that, as long as the food is OK, she feels that she can live here: “If I can eat, I feel OK”.

A month later, at our second interview, we discuss what helps Yoko feel comfortable in the UK. She replies that she switches the Japanese TV on in the morning and listens to the news: “I don’t fall behind; I keep up with the Japanese news.” She also uses Facebook, which gives her a sense that she is in touch with friends. She does these things mindlessly, knowing that “they don’t serve any purpose for her life in the UK”.

When, two months later, I go for a third and last interview, Yoko is more confident speaking English and asking questions. She has been able to have short conversations with her daughter’s teacher. As we say goodbye, Yoko tells me that she has appreciated my visits: “I don’t have contact with people from outside the house. So, one week is long. I find myself waiting for Saturday when I can be with my children and husband. It was good to have a bit of change in my daily life. ”

Gaman vs resilience

Yoko’s story reflects interviews that I conducted with six Japanese women who recently moved to the UK ; it describes the experience of many spouses of Japanese expatriates. I was amazed by the level of gaman that these women show. Gaman is a typically Japanese attitude which combines patience, endurance, tolerance and self-denial. When a child feels cold waiting at a bus stop, his mother might say “gaman shinasai” – be patient, the bus will soon arrive. Equally, when a young employee is doing well but is not rewarded or promoted, their boss might say “gaman shinasai” – be patient, you will get a promotion in a few years time. When a Japanese trainee comes back to exactly the same domestic job after one year in Europe, they may also be told “gaman shinasai” – you had a nice time abroad, what are you complaining about?

Yoko is not told “gaman shinasai” by anyone. Her husband is very supportive and would listen to any concern she has, but like many people in Japan, “gaman shinasai” has become part of her personality. She has a strong capacity to be patient – to wait until the next Saturday or until she goes back to Japan. She is able to convince herself that as long as her very basic needs are fulfilled – as long as she can eat – she feels OK.

Expatriates and their families need to be tolerant when in a foreign country. Often, they just need to “get on with it” (another good translation for gaman): an expat in Japan needs to swallow the odd sea slugs; a Japanese expat in Europe needs to bear the occasional sight of people blowing their nose in handkerchiefs… They need to have reasonable expectations – there are always difficult moments and disappointments.

But it can be counter-productive to have too much gaman, especially if it stops people wanting to improve their situation. In addition to the stoical tolerance of gaman, expatriates need (and can never have too much) personal resilience. I define resilience as ‘what you still have when you feel that you have lost everything’. It is made of self-esteem, self-confidence and a capacity for self-care and self-development (Al Siebert, The Resiliency Advantage). Whilst people with gaman readily sacrifice today for the sake of (a hopefully better) tomorrow, resilient people are able to make today as tolerable and as enjoyable as possible, despite difficult circumstances.

Gaman helps people survive, which is sometimes all they can do: eat, drink, find shelter. But too much gaman can mean, like for Yoko, locking oneself away from “people from outside the house”, holding on to old habits that “don’t serve any purpose” and living a shallow, unfulfilling life. Developing resilience involves recognising a broader range of needs and recognising one’s own skills, strengths and many other resources that can help people make the transition from gaman to enjoyment.

インタビュー

9月のある午前中、マンチェスター郊外にあるヨウコさんのお宅を訪ねました。ヨウコさんは、2歳の息子さんと一緒に私を出迎えてくれた後、イケア風のシンプルな家具が置かれたサンルームに私を通してくれ、お水を出してくれました。ヨウコさんを訪ねた理由は、駐在員の妻としてイギリスに来た経験について話を聞きたかったからです。渡英は4カ月前。イギリス赴任は「2、3年の予定」と言われて来たそうです。この環境の変化にどう対処しているかを聞いたところ、一番重要なのは食べ物で、食べ物さえ何とかなれば生活していける気がするとのことでした。「食べられれば大丈夫です」とヨウコさんは言いました。

それから1カ月後、2度目のインタビューで、イギリス生活を過ごしやすくするうえで何が役に立っているかを聞いたところ、朝、日本のテレビを入れてニュースを聞くのだと話してくれました。「遅れないように日本のニュースを聞いています」。フェイスブックも、友達との距離感を感じないようにする効果があるとのことでした。でも、単に気を紛らわせるためにしているのであって、「私のイギリス生活にとって何の意味もないことは分かっているんですけど」と話してくれました。

2カ月後に3度目のインタビューに行くと、英語で話すことや質問することに対し、以前よりも少し自信ができた様子でした。娘さんの先生と短い会話ができるようになったというのです。そして、別れ際に、私の訪問に感謝している旨を伝えてくれました。「家の外の人と話すことはないんです。なので1週間が長くて。土曜日が来るのを待っている感じなんです。土曜日になれば子供や夫が家にいますから。そんな毎日の生活に少し変化ができて良かったです」。

我慢とレジリエンス

この「ヨウコさん」とは、イギリスに比較的最近引っ越してきた日本人女性6人にインタビューして聞いた話を私が総合して作り上げた典型的な人物像です。つまり、多くの駐在員の妻の体験談を物語っています。この女性たちの我慢のレベルに、私は驚かされました。「我慢」は典型的な日本の態度であり、忍耐と辛抱と寛容、それに自己否定が一緒になったものということができます。バス停でバスを待っている時に子供が寒いと言えば、お母さんは「我慢しなさい」と言うかもしれません。もう少し待てばバスが来るからと。同様に、若手社員が良い成績を上げているのに昇給や昇進がない場合に、上司は「我慢しなさい」と言うかもしれません。あと数年すれば昇進するからと。また、研修生という身分でヨーロッパに駐在した日本人社員が、日本に戻って以前とまったく同じ仕事に戻ったならば、やはり「我慢しなさい」と言われるかもしれません。海外で楽しい時間を過ごしてきたんだから、何の文句があるのかと。

ヨウコさんは、誰かに「我慢しなさい」と言われているわけではありません。旦那さんはとてもやさしく、ヨウコさんの悩みにも耳を傾けてくれます。でも、日本人の典型に漏れず、「我慢する」が性格の一部になっているのです。ヨウコさんの辛抱強さは感心に値します。次の土曜日まで待てば、日本に帰るまで待てばいいことなのだから。そして、ごく基本的なニーズさえ満たされていればいいのだと、自分に言い聞かせているのです。それが、「食べられれば大丈夫」なのでした。

駐在員とその家族は、外国にいる間、寛容を余儀なくされます。多くの場合、単に「慣れるしかない」のです(これもまた「我慢」の別の言い方です)。日本にいる外国人の駐在員は、気持ち悪いナマコのようなものを飲み込まなければなりません。ヨーロッパにいる日本人の駐在員は、ハンカチで鼻をかむ人の光景に耐えなければなりません。そこで、穏当なレベルの期待を持っている必要があります。耐え難い瞬間やガッカリすることは必ずあるからです。

でも、あまりにも我慢をしすぎるのは、建設的ではありません。特に、状況を改善したいと思わなくなってしまう場合に、それが当てはまります。我慢というストイックな寛容に加えて、駐在員には、しなやかな強さが必要です(これはいくらあっても「過剰」ということはありません)。英語で言うとレジリエンス。私はこれを、「何もかも失ったと思える時に、まだ自分に残されているもの」と定義しています。この折れない強さを形成するのは、自尊心と自信、それに自分をいたわる包容力と自己開発の能力です(Al Siebert著「The Resiliency Advantage」より引用)。我慢のできる人は、明日のために(願わくばより良い明日のために)今日を犠牲にすることができます。一方、しなやかな強さのある人は、難しい状況にありながらも今日をできるだけ楽しみ、それほど悪くない一日にする力を持っています。

我慢は、生き抜くうえで役立ちます。食べる、飲む、寝る場所を確保する――。実際、それが精一杯という状況はあるものです。でも、あまりにも我慢をしすぎると、例えばヨウコさんの場合は、「家の外の人」から自分を切り離して閉じ込めてしまい、「何の意味もない」昔の習慣にしがみつき、深みのない満たされない生活を送ってしまうことを意味しかねません。しなやかな強さを付けるには、もっと幅広いニーズがあることを認め、自分のスキルや強さを認識して、「我慢」を「楽しみ」に変えるのを助けてくれる他の様々なリソースがあることを知らなければなりません。

Author: Cécile Buckenmeyer, Jungian Psychotherapist

CB Web PortraitI am a Jungian psychotherapist in private practice in Lancaster, UK and a cross-cultural consultant working with expatriates, TCKs, international students – and the professionals who support them. I have lived in France (where I was born), Japan (for 5 years), the USA and the UK. I speak French, English and Japanese and regularly work in these languages.

 

Comments Off